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Plastimo Compass Compensation Cell
 

Plastimo Compass Compensation Cell

  • For Plastimo Contest 130 And Mini-B Compasses
  • Optional Compensation Magnets
  • Compensates for North/South, East/West Compass Deviation
  • Item #: 
    800136
    Brand: 
    Plastimo
    Model #: 
    17673
    Shipping Weight: 
    0.01 Lbs.
    Our Price:
    $24.99
    24.99
    Status:      In Stock

    Quantity:  
     
     

    Plastimo Optional Compass Compensation Cell with compensation magnets, for Plastimo Contest 130 and Mini-B compasses.
    Compasses are supplied with built-in compensation, or can be further equipped with an optional compensation cell.

    Compensation:

    • Compasses are supplied with built-in compensation, or can be further equipped with an optional compensation.
    • Compensating a compass consists in adjusting the position of the 2 magnets, in order to affect the horizontal component of the card by modifying the North/South and East/West deviation. The compensation procedure is a delicate operation and should ideally be carried out by a professional compass adjuster.
    How to compensate a compass :

    • Use a second compass as the reference ; a handbearing compass is often the most convenient, provided it is interference-free. The North-South screw corrects North-South heading ; the East/West screw corrects East-West heading.
    • Run the boat along the Northerly course selected as per your handbearing compass and adjust your steering compass by turning the North and South screws either way, so that the steering compass also points North.
    • Repeat the procedure, running the boat Easterly.
    • Run the boat Southerly and this time, reduce the deviation by half.
    • Run the boat Westerly and reduce the deviation by half.
    • Note : Upon completing the compensation procedure, it is essential to draw a new deviation table.

    The earth magnetic field can be segmented in two components : horizontal and vertical

    • · The vertical component affects the horizontality of the compass card and pulls it to dip towards North or South. This natural force varies according to the geographical location : a compass balanced in Lorient is not horizontal in Sydney.
    • · The horizontal component exercises an influence on the card directivity. The compass environment on board and the various sources of interference create a specific, local magnetic field, which is different from the earth magnetic field. The compass does not point towards magnetic North.

    Deviation: The course discrepancy (in degrees) between the compass north and the magnetic north is called the deviation. It can be negative or positive.

    • In order to minimise this error, your compass should be installed as far as possible from objects generating local magnetic fields : compass, fire extinguisher, loudspeaker, electric wires and equipment, metallic parts of steering system, camera, tools, analogic instruments…
    • Once the deviation errors are known quantities and allowed for, the compass is a perfectly reliable navigation instrument. Deviation is then recorded graphically on a deviation curve, always handy for future reference. Deviation must be checked and updated once a year.
    • How to draw a deviation curve :
      Check that the compensation screws are in neutral position (according to the compass model, the screw slot will either be horizontal, or aligned with the dot -).
    • Although very simple, the procedure to calculate the deviation must be carefully carried out. Deviation can be checked very effectively by comparing different headings read on your steering compass, with those obtained from a handbearing compass held well clear of any interference. Standing at the stern of the boat is usually the easiest, provided it is a "non magnetic" area.
    • Example : if the handbearing compass reads 30° and the steering compass reads 34°, deviation on a course of 34° is - 4°.

    How to draw a deviation curve: Check that the compensation screws are in neutral position (according to the compass model, the screw slot will either be horizontal, or aligned with the dot -).

    • Although very simple, the procedure to calculate the deviation must be carefully carried out. Deviation can be checked very effectively by comparing different headings read on your steering compass, with those obtained from a handbearing compass held well clear of any interference. Standing at the stern of the boat is usually the easiest, provided it is a "non magnetic" area.
    • Example : if the handbearing compass reads 30° and the steering compass reads 34°, deviation on a course of 34° is - 4°.

    Step 1 : Find a position that is well away from any source of interference:

    • On a nice day with a smooth sea, run the boat under power. Select a distant object or landmark (at least 3 miles away from the boat), whose bearing in known.
    • Sight the landmark with the handbearing compass and steer the boat slowly round in circles.
    • If the bearing remains constant, it means that you are in an area well clear of any interference. If not, repeat the operation, re-siting yourself in another part of the deck.
    Step 2 : Compare headings from handbearing and steering compasses: Reversing directions, compare the 2 compasses on each heading. At this stage, the difference you may notice is only due to the deviation on the steering compass.
    Step 3 : Establish the deviation curve: To assure accuracy on all headings, check for deviation every 30° (North, 30°, 60°, East, 120° etc..) and record any deviation (positive or negative) on the deviation card.

    How to read a deviation table :

    · If deviation is no more than ± 7°, simply draw a deviation table assessing the error and keep it for future reference when calculating the true course.
    · If the deviation curve shows values between ± 7° and ± 20°, the compass must be corrected with the compensation box. A new deviation curve must then be drawn.
    · If deviation is superior to ± 20°, your compass should be re-located to another place on board, to keep well away from local magnetic fields.

    WARNING: This product MAY expose you to chemicals, which are known to the State of California to cause cancer, birth defects and/or other reproductive harm. For more information go to www.p65warnings.ca.gov
     
     

    Plastimo Replacement Compass Cover
    Item #: 803056
  • Protective Cover F
  • Contest 101
  •  Include

    $15.99
    Model #:
    25332
     
     
     

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